About Our Safe Streets Campaign

Congestion on Santa Monica Boulevard

Our Campaign for Better Transportation Choices

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Beverly Hills: Rollin’ like it’s 1977!

Better Bike is all about making our streets safe and accessible for all travelers. Since 2010 we have pressed City of Beverly Hills to leave behind our outdated transportation policies and join our Westside municipal neighbors to support safe, ‘multimodal mobility’ alternatives to the automobile.

Today we don’t have practical transportation options in Beverly Hills. While each of us expects to arrive safely at our destination regardless of whether we travel by bike, foot or car, too often choosing to walk or ride a bicycle summons fear of injury. These travel modes simply must be safe and practical options too.

As our own city plans recognize, multimodal mobility for Beverly Hills is the best solution to problems like increased congestion and greenhouse gas emissions. And our General Plan’s Circulation Element talks  about making streets safe for road users. But it’s just talk if no policy supports it. Indeed collisions injure too many non-motor travelers on city streets. Bike-involved collisions account for ten percent of total collisions, for example, which is too many since people on bicycles make up less than 1% of all road users. Worse, in Beverly Hills nearly 300 collisions every year are hit-and-run. Where are the policies to address these problems?

We know from other cities that bicycle lanes and similar state-approved safety improvements not only make cyclists safer, they make cyclists feel safer too. And that encourages more of us to take a bicycle instead of a car – particularly women who often say they feel particularly vulnerable sharing the streets with harried drivers.

Yet facilities like bicycle lanes, bike ‘boxes,’ and bike-priority signaling find no welcome in Beverly Hills. Though we have a Bicycle Master Plan that calls for a bike route network, the plan dates from 1977 (as in ‘disco’ era 1977) and has yet to be revisited in the five years since our General Plan called for an update.

The First Step to Safer Streets is a A Real Bike Plan

Since 2010 Better Bike has called for the creation of a plan and implementation of programs and improvements that would make cycling safe. We’ve asked for dedicated bike lanes, intersection improvements, safety signage, and bike parking – all measures that we see in other cities that signals a bike-friendly environment – but to no avail. Why can’t we create streets that are safe for kids and adults biking to school, work, and shops?

Well we can. We need only look back to that 1970-era plan for guidance. From it we can begin to discuss what could be the citywide bike route network that we need. Here’s our first draft of what a comprehensive bicycle network should look like:

Bike routes Bevery Hills proposed map

A bike network in the making: Santa Monica Boulevard and Charleville provide east-west through routes while Beverly and Crescent drives afford north-south travel. Major points of access to surrounding cities come at the western gateway, Burton Way in the east, Sunset to the north and Beverly to the south.

We believe that at a minimum a Beverly Hills bike route network should include:

  • Routes that connect our five city schools and our key business districts;
  • Pavement markings and signage that show motorists and cyclists alike how to safely traverse major intersections;
  • Marked bike lanes on key corridors and shared-lane markings called “sharrows” on all secondary streets;
  • Bicycle racks where people need them and bike rack ‘corrals’ at high bike traffic points;
  • City-sponsored riding skills & road safety classes for all age groups and integrated into our Summer recreation program; and,
  • Changes to transportation and development policies to discourage auto commuting and encourage mass transit with the bicycle providing the proverbial ‘last mile’ connection between work, home, and transit.

Where Are We Now?

Four years ago our Traffic & Parking Commission created an ad-hoc Bike Plan Update committee to bring our 1977-era Bicycle Master Plan into the modern era, but it has made no recommendations. Three years ago, staff began to talk about more bicycle racks, but the fewer-than-25 to be installed haven’t yet found a place on our our sidewalks. No sign advises riders and drivers to share the road. Not even a simple city webpage offers safe-riding tips. We haven’t come a long way baby.

By calling attention to the safety hazards of cycling in Beverly Hills, we hope to highlight the challenges of simply choosing to ride a bike here. In the face of intransigent city officials and a population unschooled in the joys and practical benefits of cycling, have you any suggestions to offer? Let us know.

Recent Posts

Are You a ‘Team Player’? Traffic Commission Has Two Vacancies

TPC-openingDo you savor cracking down on tour buses in Beverly Hills? Can you see yourself jawboning about handicapped placard abuse year-after-year? Do you thirst for control over parking valets? Do you relish the chance to break the chops of our taxi franchisees?  Then does the city have an opportunity for you! The Traffic and Parking Commission has a couple of open chairs just begging to be warmed. You could be the lucky next commissioner!

The Traffic and Parking Commission “shall act as an advisory agency to the council in all matters which relate to parking and traffic,” says the municipal code. Its remit includes to “advise and counsel as to ways and means to improve general traffic conditions” and prepare “a comprehensive long range plan relating to transportation, traffic, and off street and on street parking in the city.” The traffic and parking commission also approves the installation or removal of stop signs, the code adds.

And boy can Beverly Hills use the commission’s counsel! Congestion is legion; our own plans even call for encouraging other modes of transportation to reduce it. We have problem intersections like Olympic & Beverly and  Santa Monica & Wilshire that are seemingly designed to cause crashes. And not surprisingly, Beverly Hills sees more collision injuries than most every other small city in California.

As a commissioner you will be one of only five city commissioners who will receive a police stats report showing the number of crash injuries and traffic citations written every month. You’ll question the department and transportation staff and make motions and vote on policies that can make a difference where safety is concerned.

You will have a lot of company should you take an inordinate interest in regulating tour bus activity. That’s a perennial favorite because tour buses ply the northside residential streets that celebrities and City Council call home. You’ll find fellow inquisitors who, like you, are interested to know whether one or other restaurant has sufficient valet staffing. And by gosh if parking permits are your thing, you’ll find the commission the perfect home for your regulatory zeal.

That’s the good news.

The bad news is that you, an engaged and enthusiastic new commissioner, will sit aside four commissioners who generally don’t question the police data and whatever they may suggest about the city’s concern for safe streets. Take up that discussion and your performance will be a monologue. And don’t count on digging in too deep that “a comprehensive long range” transportation plan as promised by the municipal code. Outside of the periodic updates to our circulation element as required by state law, we don’t do much so-called advance planning when it comes to mobility.

But hey, the city’s not asking much from you as the successful candidate need bring no particular experience or knowledge to the task. If the last round of commission applicants is any indication, you need not even ever have attended a commission meeting. Just attend one before you take your seat; the learning curve isn’t too intimidating.

But you are a team player, right? As in Team Beverly Hills? According to the ‘How to Become a Commissioner’ webpage, “City Council recommends individuals interested in serving on a City commission first participate in the Team Beverly Hills Residential Educational Program to become acquainted with the City operations.”

You can read between the lines here: fancy yourself a critic of Beverly Hills City Hall policies? No need to apply. Instead you’ll enjoy a couple of minutes at the mic at the beginning of the commission’s meeting for your public comment. That’s the first Thursday of every month at 9:30 a.m.

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